Categories:

Stories

There's so much to learn about this tropical paradise we call Hawai'i. Start your journey today by reading more about what makes this place so special.

Hiking Kā‘ena Point Trail

Posted in: Environment, Things to Do

Story and Images by Sarah Yamanaka, Executive Editor This arid coastal hike located in Kā‘ena Point State Park begins a little less than three miles from Kā‘ena Point on both sides of the Wai‘anae mountain range. You can start the trail in either Wai‘anae (2.4 miles one way) or Mokulē‘ia (2.5 miles one way); where the paved road ends is where the trail begins.  An early view on the Kāʻena Point Trail A group of us started in Mokulē‘ia. No blue skies, just gray clouds above for which we were ... Read More

Searching for Humpbacks: Whale Watching on Oahu

Posted in: Environment, Things to Do

We’re thrilled to have seen the first of many Humpback whales (kohola) in our island waters, and you can too. Nothing beats being able to see a mammoth whale up close in their natural habitat. Get ready to get acquainted with the mighty Humpback. A breaching Humpback whale [Photo Courtesy Dolphin Excursions] These mighty and endangered humpback whales travel thousands of miles from their home in Alaskan waters to the Pacific Ocean, a route they undertake year after year. Like other mammals such as caribou whose migration routes are passed ... Read More

Let's Go Whale Watching! How, Where and When to Enjoy Watching Humpback Whales in Maui

Posted in: Environment, Events, Things to Do

  Every winter, about 4,000-5,000 Humpback whales—two-thirds of the whole North Pacific population, migrate to Hawai‘i’s warm waters from the chilly environs of Alaska for a well-deserved respite. The peak of their activity is from January through March, making this an ideal time for us to view them in the wild. A whale breaching off the coast of Maui [Photo Courtesy Pacific Whale Foundation] While summers in Alaska are devoted to feeding, their winters in Hawai‘i are focused on reproduction. In fact, the state is considered the nation’s primary mating ... Read More

Adventures on Haleakala

Posted in: Culture & History, Environment, Things to Do

At over 10,000 feet high, saying that Haleakala is impressive is an understatement. Everyone who visits Maui should make a point of heading to the summit to experience the glorious views and unique landscapes. While catching a sunrise from the summit is worth the trip in itself, the slopes of this dormant volcano are home to other attractions that are also worth a visit.   If feeling cool mountain air on your face while taking in out-of-this-world views is up your alley, you just might enjoy an excursion with Bike ... Read More

Going Deep with Maui Divers Jewelry’s Cole Slater

Posted in: Environment, People, Shopping, Things to Do

By Kent Coules, Publisher Most successful jewelry companies don’t start out as a dive shop. But this is Hawai‘i, where unusual starts to local businesses are commonplace. With that in mind... Backstroke to 1958 when master divers Jack Ackerman and Larry Wembley took guests deep-sea diving off Lahaina, Maui. On that day, more than 200 feet below the surface, they came across something mysterious and never before seen—black coral. “Black coral is only found in waters between 150-300 feet deep off Maui,” says Cole Slater, executive vice president for Maui ... Read More

Ali‘i Kula Lavender Farm: The Legacy of a Master Gardener and Visionary

Posted in: Culture & History, Environment, Things to Do

By Kent Coules, Publisher Lav•en•der - Noun1. a small aromatic evergreen shrub of the mint family, with narrow leaves and bluish-purple flowers. 2. a pale blue color with a trace of mauve. Lavender is known to represent purity, silence, devotion, serenity, grace and calmness. When you read reviews from visitors to the Ali‘i Kula Lavender Farm, you see these same words and their synonyms to describe the experience.   Fragrant lavender growing at Ali‘i Kula “Lavender comes from the Latin word ‘lavare,’” says Sarah Adams, Customer Service Supervisor at the farm. “On ... Read More

From Kīlauea to Kalalau — Your North Shore Adventure

Posted in: Culture & History, Environment, Things to Do

You’ll need a gameplan to visit Kaua‘i’s North Shore, namely, to enter Hā‘ena State Park—so keep reading. But don’t miss the incredible sites—and sights—along the way! Kapa‘a Coastal Path [Photo HTA / Heather Goodman] The drive along Kūhiō Highway 56 is among the island’s most delightful. From Kīlauea to the end of the famous Kalalau Trail, the panoramas along this part of the coastline are indeed breathtaking, and have been made famous by Hollywood films. A thought to keep in mind is that while you’re on vacation enjoying the sights, ... Read More

Talking Story with Fair Wind Cruises’ Alex Dant: How a Bad Mooring Started an Iconic Business

Posted in: Environment, Things to Do

By Kent Coules, Publisher When I ask Fair Wind Cruises VP of Operations Alex Dant to sum up how the business has changed over 48 years, he says, “When we started, it was about going out with our guests and enjoying nature. Today we also teach our guests how to protect the resources. That’s part of our kuleana (responsibility).” Fair Wind takes their role in protecting their work environment very seriously. For several years, all Fair Wind boats have run on bio-diesel fuel, which consists of recycled vegetable oil and ... Read More

Hawai‘i Wildlife: An Overview of Island Fauna

Posted in: Environment

Hawai‘i's isolated postion in the middle of the Pacific Ocean has meant that the island chain is home to unique creatures that can't be found anywhere else int he world, while also playing host to wildlife from all corners of the Pacific Rim that pass through, like the legendary Humpback whale. Meanwhile, contact with humans and then later, the Western world, saw the introduction of other species that now make the islands home. Here are a number of species, both endemic and invasive, that you may encounter during your stay: [Photo: ... Read More

CLIMB Works: A North Shore Zipline Adventure

Posted in: Culture & History, Environment, People, Things to Do

By Kent Coules, Publisher When Aaron Campbell bought Keana Farms with a partner over 13 years ago, ziplining wasn’t even on his radar. “We bought the land to create affordable housing. For a number of reasons that were beyond our control we had to back off from that goal.” Having been raised on the North Shore since he was a little boy, Campbell’s mission was still to use the land to help the local community. “I loved the fact that the 450 acres was a working farm that delivered a ... Read More

Talkin' Turtles: An Intro to the Honu of Hawai‘i

Posted in: Environment

By Fern Gavelek A visit to Hawai‘i is extra special when you come across a wild turtle — whether swimming along a reef or basking on a beach. The Aloha State is home to a handful of turtle species, but the most common is the green sea turtle (honu), followed by the endangered hawksbill (honu‘ea). A green sea turtle resting on a beach [Photo N. Mucnjack / Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund] All of Hawai‘i’s honu are protected by federal and state laws from harassment, harm, pursuit, collecting, trapping or killing. These ... Read More

What's Going On at Mauna Kea? A Visitors Guide to TMT

Posted in: Culture & History, Editor's Blog, Environment

By Richard Melendez, Digital Editor Thirty Meter Telescope You may have seen the marchers pass by your hotel or driven by sign-wavers along the side of the road. Maybe you even had plans to visit the summit of Mauna Kea that had to be scrapped because of the road closure. Mauna Kea is all over the news and social media, and a hot topic of conversation here and abroad. Even celebrities like Bruno Mars and The Rock are chiming in and visiting the site. TMT Protest The reason for all ... Read More

Waimea Valley: The North Shore's Hidden Treasure

Posted in: Culture & History, Editor's Blog, Environment, Things to Do

By Richard Melendez, Digital Editor A taro patch, just one of the many culturally significant collections of flora found in the valley This weekend we took a drive up to O‘ahu’s North Shore and visited Waimea Vally. I last visited this site about 20 years—and at least two landowners owners—ago. In fact, it’s been so long that I can’t really remember much about how it was back then compared to how it is today. What I can tell you is that the Waimea Valley of today is a more than ... Read More

Rainy Day Fun on Maui

Posted in: Environment, Food & Drink, Shopping, Things to Do

By Lauren LaDoux, Maui Sales Director Yes, it rains even in paradise. It doesn’t happen often but when it does, what do you do? You could wait it out. NEVER! Why would you do that when Maui is full of so many fun things to do, rain or shine! We’ve compiled a list of our top things to do on the chance that Maui releases the flood gates.   MAUI OCEAN CENTER It doesn’t matter if you have kids or not—Maui Ocean Center is a treat for all ages! They ... Read More

Planning Your Vacation: Five Must Do Activities on Maui

Posted in: Culture & History, Environment, Things to Do

Planning a vacation can be overwhelming. With so many exciting and unique things to do here in the islands, it can be hard to decide what’s worth doing and way too easy to overlook some winners. No worries, we got you! Here are a few must-do activities on Maui that we think you should add to your bucket list, just so you can check them off when you get here! Attend a Lūau Experience Hawaiian culture at an authentic lūau [Photo courtesy Old Lahaina Luau] A luau is more than ... Read More

Hawai‘i Trivia: Ten Questions About Kaua‘i

Posted in: Culture & History, Environment

  Let’s face it. Hawai‘i is downright fascinating. It’s the most isolated land mass, with the world’s tallest mountain (measured from the ocean floor), and the most active volcano, and that’s just three off the top of our heads! (Read more about Hawai‘i’s unique characteristics here). Now its time to test your knowledge of Kaua‘i. Scroll down past the photo and let’s see how you do with these ten questions:   A view of Kaua‘i's breathtaking Waimea Canyon   1.  Kaua‘i’s nickname is: a) The Emerald Isle b) The Garden ... Read More

Hawai‘i Trivia: Five Questions About Maui

Posted in: Culture & History, Environment

  Maui is known for being one of the best islands in the world to visit. It has amazing beaches, boasts world-class hotels, golf courses and restaurants, and hosts approximately 4,000 migrating humpback whales every year. Scroll on down past the photo and let’s see how much you know about Maui by taking this five-question quiz:   The serene slopes of Haleakalā   1. There are 132 islands in the Hawaiian chain. By size, Maui is the: a) Largest b) Second largest c) Third largest d) Sixth largest   2. ... Read More

Kaua‘i Visitors Pledge Online to Holo Holo (Travel) Responsibly

Posted in: Culture & History, Environment

By Kent Coules, Publisher Holo Holo Charters' Pono Pledge aims to address the impacts of destination travel Kaua‘i is a special place, and many tour and activity companies feel a kuleana (responsibility) to the ʻāina (land) when sharing it with their guests. Holo Holo Charters, a 20-year-old, locally-owned boat tour company, understands the impact destination travel can have on the environment both economically and experientially, so they proactively created an online “Pono (righteous) Pledge” encouraging all passengers to complete before they actually set sail on their Kaua‘i ocean adventure. The pledge brings more than ... Read More

The Honolulu Zoo: Birth of Baby Bongo Antelope Highlights Importance of Our Zoos

Posted in: Editor's Blog, Environment, Things to Do

By Richard Melendez, Digital Editor Yesterday’s announcement that a baby bongo antelope was recently born at the Honolulu Zoo got me thinking about what a great resource our zoo is. If you hadn’t heard, the Honolulu Zoo’s two eastern lowland bongo antelope, Topenga (the mom) and Cory (the dad), gave birth to an as-yet-unnamed calf who is pretty darn adorable. See? Sheʻs adorable, right?? There are currently an estimated 28,000 bongo antelope existing in the wild, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has categorized them as “near ... Read More

Hawai‘i Shark Facts: What a Local Wants You to Know

Posted in: Environment, Things to Do

By Kent Coules, Publisher selachophobia: Noun. An irrational fear or dislike of sharks. If you’re coming to Hawai‘i, want to snorkel with family and friends but are terrified of sharks, then this story is for you. I’ve looked at a ton of stories online about sharks, and sharks in Hawai‘i, but there’s something missing when it comes to these articles. They’ll talk about the 40 or so shark species in Hawaiian waters, the four most common species, and the astronomical odds against being a victim of an attack. What’s missing ... Read More

Plan Your Trip

Book Your Vacation

Book Your Vacation

Plan your own idyllic getaway with the Hawaii travel experts. Our partner, Pleasant Holidays, has created unforgettable vacations to the Hawaiian Islands for more than half a century, and can help you with all your travel arrangements.

Book now

Book Your Activities

Experience Your Hawaii

Enhance your vacation with activities and experience the very best of the islands. From helicopter flights to snorkeling adventures, from luaus to eco-tours, Pleasant Activities has hundreds of engaging activities that will catch your fancy.

Book now!

Follow Us

Follow Hawaii's #1 visitor guide magazine for the latest happenings! Hashtag #thisweekhawaii to be featured on our page!

Follow Us On Instagram Follow Us On Facebook